Supporting Student Writing

Supporting Student Writing

Writing is essential to good learning; it is an important tool for reflection and deep thinking. But, as Ernest Hemingway said, “Easy writing makes hard reading”; writing well requires work and life-long commitment. Encouraging students’ desire to improve their writing and to see themselves as writers is critical to their success as they transition from SF State to the workforce and beyond. Writing is one of several important high-impact educational practices with demonstrated benefits for college students from diverse backgrounds.

What is WAC/WID?

Writing across the curriculum/writing in the discipline (WAC/WID) describes a student-centered national movement to integrate writing across the curriculum and within all disciplines in higher education. At SF State, the Division of Undergraduate Studies and Academic Planning, the Committee on English Proficiency (CWEP), and Academic Affairs share responsibility for university-wide WAC. The WAC/WID program on campus, under the leadership of Juliana van Olphen, director, and Jennifer Swanson, associate director, aims to provide support to faculty teaching writing-intensive courses through creating opportunities for faculty to share best practices for effective writing pedagogy and strategies to assess student writing. WAC/WID on campus has the following goals:

  • To improve students’ writing proficiency throughout their education at San Francisco State University (SF State)
  • To promote principles of WAC/WID (https://wac.colostate.edu/intro/pop3a.cfm) at SF State
  • To foster faculty engagement in teaching writing and support the development and dissemination of effective writing pedagogy across campus
  • To promote the development and dissemination of effective practices and tools to assess student writing across campus
  • To create a campus culture that values writing as a high impact practice in higher education.

(415) 338-2206

ueap @sfsu.edu

Division of Undergraduate Education and Academic Planning
ADM 447 | San Francisco State University | 1600 Holloway Avenue | San Francisco, CA 94132